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AR/VR

Published on July 28th, 2020 | by Emergent Enterprise

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Apple Plans to Dominate all Aspects of AR with ‘Apple Glass’ and More

Emergent Insight:
There are many obvious reasons Apple has an advantage in potentially making augmented reality successful. The strength of the brand, the collective innovative force of Apple minds and a rock solid technology infrastructure are just a few. But, as William Gallagher reports at AppleInsider, Apple is building a strategy that is more than just build a device and put it out there. Apple is not going to release something until they deem it “useful and desirable.” This has been the stumbling block of many AR & VR developers as they rush to be in the market. There has to be something more than just a shiny device that looks cool and does something provocative. It needs to be “sticky” and provide experiences that a user wants to return to time after time.

Original Article:

The rumored “Apple Glass” headset may be a single hardware product, but the continuing flood of research looks more like Apple is intending to use AR as a sea change in how we use all of our devices.

Whether Apple AR‘s first product turns out to be “Apple Glass” or something else, it is not going to ship as a hobby device like the Apple TV. It’s also not going to be even remotely like AirPods or HomePod, which might slot in to the existing Apple Music service but are otherwise standalone products.

Instead, when Apple AR hits, it is going to ultimately hit big. Perhaps it will launch with one device at first, but that device will bring with it something akin to its own ecosystem — and one that it is at the very least as comprehensively worked out as the iOS one is today.

Apple has not started with the idea of making an AR device and seeing where it goes. The company has spent years investigating every possible aspect, designing new systems and devices. And it has been patenting everything along the way.

New patent application filings this week represent just the latest of countless filings, but they also provide a preview of just how thorough and wide-reaching Apple is being.

One, filed in January 2020 but revealed this week, tackles the broad issues regarding “Head-Mounted Display and Facial Interface Thereof.” It’s concerned with the core principles of fastening a unit to a wearer’s face, and then about displaying graphical content on it.

Detail showing one method of securing a headset to a user's head comfortably

Detail showing one method of securing a headset to a user’s head comfortably

The separation of the unit and the display into related but different concerns, seems to be key to this application. So is making that head-mounted display stay on the user’s head securely and comfortably.

“The facial interface is coupled to the display and engages the face of the user to support the display thereon,” says the patent. “The facial interface may influence comfort of the user, especially when worn for long periods of time, and stability of the head-mounted display on the head of the user.”

It’s about fitting a head-mounted device and keeping it secure. “The facial interface includes an upper portion that engages a forehead of the user and side portions that engage temple regions of the user,” continues the application. “The facial interface converts forward force applied to the upper portion by the forehead into inward force applied by side portions to the temple regions.”

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Emergent Enterprise

The Emergent Enterprise (EE) website brings together current and important news in enterprise mobility and the latest in innovative technologies in the business world. The articles are hand selected by Emergent Enterprise and not the result of automated electronic aggregating. The site is designed to be a one-stop shop for anyone who has an ongoing interest in how technology is changing how the world does business and how it affects the workforce from the shop floor to the top floor. EE encourages visitor contributions and participation through comments, social media activity and ratings.



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